Dislike

Accordion Orchestra 
(or Open Instrumentation)
and Speaking Voices

DISLIKE is a 21st century operatic documentation of a unique repository for the darker emotions swirling around the Internet. The sinister side of online anonymity and open-forum communication is examined by deconstructing 24-hours worth of comments on the most “disliked” video on YouTube. Taken as a singular libretto, the result is a surreal text full of anger, naivety, homophobia, desperation, and mischief. Meanwhile, eight accordions create a lush, post-ambient sonic environment inspired by a time-stretched interpretation of that video’s song. The resulting dichotomy depicts the Jungian shadow of the digital collective unconscious.

 Dislike was premiered at REDCAT’s 2013 NOW Festival after a workshop at the Electric Lodge’s High Voltage Series! It featured Free Reed Conspiracy and The Peoples Microphony Camerata.

Read my article on LA Stage Times about Dislike

Dislike at Re-Re-Generation

Livestream performance on September 19, 2020 as part of CultureHub’s Re-Re-Generation.

Performers: Patrick Behnke, Andrew Choate, Daniel Corral, April Guthrie, Timothy Maloof, Cynthia Aaron Paige, Andrea Saenz, Joanna Wallfisch


PRESS

2013 press for Dislike

Living Out Loud Los Angeles: “This was truly a treat for all, from our soft spoken dreamers to our extroverted realists, we all went home with a true image of how ugly we can be and how much help we all owe each other.” 

Musings by a Dancing Poetess“By the end of the piece, I hated YouTube; I hated the Internet, and I would have given anything to make it stop. But, my experience of discomfort was what created the power in the Corral’s social commentary.” 

Local Looking Glass: “Its music was Baby’s chords played in discordant waves of sound a la Koyaanisqatsi.” 

LA Weekly: “Composer Daniel Corral, whose work probes the weirdness of 21st-century living, has written a libretto called Dislike, about the most disliked YouTube video of all time.” 

LA Stage Times: “Full of anger, naivete, homophobia, desperation, and mischief, these comments portray a Burroughsian narrative seemingly cut straight from the cloth of the collective unconscious.”

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